A Companion To Medieval English Literature and Culture by Peter Brown

By Peter Brown

A significant other to Medieval English Literature and tradition, c.1350-c.1500 demanding situations readers to imagine past a narrowly outlined canon and traditional disciplinary limitations. A ground-breaking number of newly-commissioned essays on medieval literature and tradition. Encourages scholars to imagine past a narrowly outlined canon and standard disciplinary barriers. displays the erosion of the normal, inflexible boundary among medieval and early smooth literature. Stresses the significance of making contexts for studying literature. Explores the level to which medieval literature is in discussion with different cultural items, together with the literature of different international locations, manuscripts and faith. contains shut readings of frequently-studied texts, together with texts by means of Chaucer, Langland, the Gawain poet, and Hoccleve. Confronts a few of the controversies that workout scholars of medieval literature, corresponding to these attached with literary conception, love, and chivalry and struggle.

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A Companion To Medieval English Literature and Culture c.1350 - c.1500 (Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture)

A better half to Medieval English Literature and tradition, c. 1350-c. 1500 demanding situations readers to imagine past a narrowly outlined canon and traditional disciplinary obstacles. A ground-breaking number of newly-commissioned essays on medieval literature and tradition. Encourages scholars to imagine past a narrowly outlined canon and traditional disciplinary barriers.

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Extra resources for A Companion To Medieval English Literature and Culture c.1350 - c.1500 (Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture)

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This area of newly theorized research is thus conceived in a vein similar to the Cambridge History, where the results combine the work of specialists not only in the languages of England – Old English, Middle English, Latin and Anglo-Norman – but also in those of Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Coming to recognize the multilingual character of medieval English culture has also enabled manuscript studies to flourish. Another example of collaborative research exists in an international project that exemplifies directions in which such studies are moving.

Princeton: Princeton University Press. An exploration of how fifteenth-century readers of Chaucer created his persona as father of English poetry. Minnis, A. , Morse, Charlotte C. and TurvillePetre, Thorlac (eds) 1997. Essays on Ricardian Literature in Honour of J. A. Burrow. Oxford: Clarendon Press. Fourteen essays on various topics in Ricardian literature, honouring the coiner of the term ‘Ricardian Poetry’. ) 1999. Chaucer to Spenser: An Anthology of Writings in English, 1375–1575. Oxford: Blackwell.

The critical judgement implicit in the Norton Anthology asserts that while texts by women must be acknowledged, relatively little else has changed in what we ought to read. 2 Its ‘The Middle Ages’ section includes everything in Norton save Everyman and Noah (for which Mankind and the York Crucifixion are substituted) with quite a few additions. Some additions amplify the Norton offerings: more Chaucer and a larger sampling of Piers Plowman, Julian and Kempe. Other additions insert new perspectives: the political dimension of non-literary works on the Rising of 1381 and ‘vernacular religion and repression’; the multicultural voices in insular works from Scotland and Wales; a deepened recognition of fifteenth-century culture as reflected in selections from John Lydgate and Christine de Pizan.

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